martedì 25 ottobre 2011

Prolapse "Back Saturday"





Non è 1 ascolto facile quello dei Prolapse, se poi avete cominciato ad avvicinarvi al gruppo con Italian Flag, beh, questo lavoro precedente potrebbe spiazzare.
Quindi tranquilli e apertura mentale. E che il viaggio abbia inizio... (1995 Lissy's)

A swirling maelstrom of the rantings of Mark E. Smith, the grinding guitar work of Thurston Moore and sweet girlie-pop vocals of Kristin Hersh (Throwing Muses) thunder down the drain with enough energy to wake the dead.
All this and more in the shape of a Leicester six-piece. She (Linda Steelyard) sings, he (Mike Derrick) shouts in a thick semi-comprehensible Scottish brogue. This, on top of some serious hardline disc(h)ordant rock that has its roots in Can. At times an almost industrial rock sound with bass (Mick), guitar (David and Pat) and drums (Tim).
Their own claimed refernces, comparisons and influences include early Fall, Sonic Youth, Faith Healers, Pavement, Pere Ubu, Joy Division and so on. I would also throw in a serious comparison with Blurt, and to a certain extent, the ringing guitars of early Cure.
They would want you to believe that Prolapse is "where yer anal organs fall out of yer backside", haha! they're just joshing. They actually sound like a reasonable loveable bunch; in any case they have a fine ear for a tune.
This is Prolapse's second album. The first, Pointless Walks to Dismal Places was released in the UK in 1994. All in all, this one is a very refreshing listen. My theory is that the days of the all-male band are dead and gone. The most interesting stuff happening now is with groups with both boys *and* girls. And with the dual (duelling) vocals of Kate and Mike, Prolapse have a lot going for them.
The comparisons are easy to make. The first track, "Mein Minefield, Mine Landmine", starts off in a gathering wail of feedback, and then kicks off very much like the opening track to Sonic Youth's Goo.
After that we're into a ringing Mary Chain-style guitar piece, "TCR", with Kate's vocals clearly soaring over the top of it all, and then "Framen Fr. Cesar", where we meet Mike and are acquainted with his fondness of bellowing through a megaphone, or some weird device that renders his words nigh on incomprehensible. But then, that may also be the Scottish blood in him. Closest comparison would be Blurt -- a heavy, rhythmic boogie.
Introductions over, we get into the meat of the album. "Every Night I'm Crucified (7,000 Times)" is a massive track. I think they intend this one to be the single. It's got a big, fat drum track; essentially without vocals, and ends with the most haunting guitar wail, the kind that sends you into a retrospective trip, as anyone who has heard of "All I Want" or "Too Personal" from the Mekons will know (which for some reason came to mind when listening to this).
My favourite track on this album is "Zen Nun Deb", an early-Cure, Joy-Division-with-girl-vocals piece. Probably not as representative of them as some of the others, but that's probably why it stands out so much ahead of the rest.
The only real weak point: "Irritating Radiator", which is just that; sounds like a noisy, aimless jam and the taping equipment happened to be switched on. On the other hand, there is "Flex", long slow instrumental, very Sonic Youth, that slowly winds up into a pounding, blistering rocker; the kind that sends the mosh pit into a frenzy. Definitely not the one you'll hear on the radio - the damned thing must go on for quarter of an hour.
The album closes with a melancholic dirge, "Strain Contortion of Bag" as if the whole band were suffering total exhaustion; no doubt they were.
To sum up, there's really only one less-good track in the whole lot of Back Saturday, which makes for a pretty good batting average. Long may they play. (David Landgren - http://www.westnet.com/)


- Flex
- Framen Fr Cesar
- Every Night I'm Mentally Crucified (7000 Times)
- Zen Nun Deb
- Drown Radio Therapy
- Strain Contortion Of Bag


PROLAPSE

1 commento:

  1. No, non lo è per niente un ascolto facile. Però alla fine ci sta dai, come si fa a scoprire la propria musica del cuore se non la si va a cercare anche nei giardini degli altri? Saluti, curatore di questo blog.

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